December 28, 2012
The Upper Level by claustral on Flickr.

The Upper Level by claustral on Flickr.

July 12, 2011

July 12, 2011

July 4, 2011
Bloopdy wooden grid sculpture looks neat - Boing Boing

June 26, 2011
gorge (by jan_vandorpe)

gorge (by jan_vandorpe)

June 25, 2011
Lesser Slave River, Alberta (by Michael J Leonard)

Lesser Slave River, Alberta (by Michael J Leonard)

June 24, 2011
mohandasgandhi:

What Happened to Media Coverage of Fukushima?

While the U.S. media has been occupied with Anthony Weiner, the  Republican presidential candidates and Bristol Palin’s memoir, coverage  of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster has practially  fallen off the map. Poor mainstream media coverage of Japan’s now  months-long struggle to gain control over the Fukushima disaster has  deprived Americans of crucial information about the risks of nuclear  power following natural disasters. After a few weeks of covering the  early aftermath of Japan’s earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. media moved  on, leaving behind the crisis at Fukushima which continues to unfold.  U.S. politicians, like Rep. Joe Barton of Texas, have made disappointing and misleading statements about the relative safety of nuclear power  and have vowed to stick by our nuclear program, while other countries,  like Germany and Italy,  have taken serious steps to address the obvious risks of nuclear power  — risks that the Fukushima disaster made painfully evident, at least to  the rest of the world.
News outlets in other countries have been paying attention to  Fukushima, though, and a relative few in this country have as well. A  June 16, 2011 Al Jazeera English article titled, “Fukushima: It’s much worse than you think,” quotes a high-level former nuclear industry executive, Arnold  Gunderson, who called Fukushima nohting less than “the biggest  industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Twenty nuclear cores  have been exposed at Fukushima, Gunderson points out, saying along with  the site’s many spent-fuel pools, this gives Fukushima 20 times the  release potential of Chernobyl.
[…]
For Americans who think “out of sight, out of mind” or “it can’t happen  here” when it comes to Fukishima and its ramifications, think again. Janette Sherman, M.D.,  an internal medicine specialist, and Joseph Magano, an epidemiologist  with the Radiation and Public Health Project research group, noticed a  35% jump in infant mortality in eight northwestern U.S. cities located within 500 miles of the Pacific coast since the Fukushima meltdown. They wrote an essay, published by CounterPunch,  suggesting there may be a link between the statistic and the Fukushima  disaster. They cited similar problems with infant mortality among people  who were exposed to nuclear fallout from Chernobyl. Sherman and Magano  urge that steps be taken to measure the levels of radioactive isotopes  in the environment of the Pacific northwest, and in the bodies of people  in these areas, to determine if nuclear fallout from Fukushima could,  in fact, be related to the spike in infant mortality. 
(Read more)

[Image via]

mohandasgandhi:

What Happened to Media Coverage of Fukushima?

While the U.S. media has been occupied with Anthony Weiner, the Republican presidential candidates and Bristol Palin’s memoir, coverage of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster has practially fallen off the map. Poor mainstream media coverage of Japan’s now months-long struggle to gain control over the Fukushima disaster has deprived Americans of crucial information about the risks of nuclear power following natural disasters. After a few weeks of covering the early aftermath of Japan’s earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. media moved on, leaving behind the crisis at Fukushima which continues to unfold. U.S. politicians, like Rep. Joe Barton of Texas, have made disappointing and misleading statements about the relative safety of nuclear power and have vowed to stick by our nuclear program, while other countries, like Germany and Italy, have taken serious steps to address the obvious risks of nuclear power — risks that the Fukushima disaster made painfully evident, at least to the rest of the world.

News outlets in other countries have been paying attention to Fukushima, though, and a relative few in this country have as well. A June 16, 2011 Al Jazeera English article titled, “Fukushima: It’s much worse than you think,” quotes a high-level former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gunderson, who called Fukushima nohting less than “the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Twenty nuclear cores have been exposed at Fukushima, Gunderson points out, saying along with the site’s many spent-fuel pools, this gives Fukushima 20 times the release potential of Chernobyl.

[…]

For Americans who think “out of sight, out of mind” or “it can’t happen here” when it comes to Fukishima and its ramifications, think again. Janette Sherman, M.D., an internal medicine specialist, and Joseph Magano, an epidemiologist with the Radiation and Public Health Project research group, noticed a 35% jump in infant mortality in eight northwestern U.S. cities located within 500 miles of the Pacific coast since the Fukushima meltdown. They wrote an essay, published by CounterPunch, suggesting there may be a link between the statistic and the Fukushima disaster. They cited similar problems with infant mortality among people who were exposed to nuclear fallout from Chernobyl. Sherman and Magano urge that steps be taken to measure the levels of radioactive isotopes in the environment of the Pacific northwest, and in the bodies of people in these areas, to determine if nuclear fallout from Fukushima could, in fact, be related to the spike in infant mortality. 

(Read more)

[Image via]

(via clatko)

June 23, 2011
Colors of Fall, Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, Alberta (by Michael J Leonard)

Colors of Fall, Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, Alberta (by Michael J Leonard)

June 21, 2011
woodendreams:

(by Shuggie!!)

woodendreams:

(by Shuggie!!)

June 21, 2011
augustmoons:

Öschinensee (by Feffef)

augustmoons:

Öschinensee (by Feffef)

(via jakewobegon)

June 21, 2011
augustmoons:

paddies (by davanita)

augustmoons:

paddies (by davanita)

June 21, 2011
lori-rocks:
The Rise Of Mt Shuksan  by ~ Aaron Reed ~

lori-rocks:

The Rise Of Mt Shuksan
by ~ Aaron Reed ~

(via jakewobegon)

June 21, 2011
magicalnaturetour:

Prospector Photographer ~ The Big Dipper

magicalnaturetour:

Prospector Photographer ~ The Big Dipper

(via tormentalous)

June 21, 2011
woodendreams:

(by Marc Shandro)

woodendreams:

(by Marc Shandro)

June 21, 2011
llbwwb:

la malga casnago (by maudanros)

llbwwb:

la malga casnago (by maudanros)

(via jakewobegon)

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